A Less Than Ideal Christmas

A Less Than Ideal Christmas

The story of Christmas is a story we can cling to when life gets real,
all year long.

Have you ever had a less-than-ideal Christmas? I have. It happened during my junior year of college when I was working my way through school as a security guard. I was a week away from final exams and a month-long Christmas break, trying to figure out how I would miss those four weeks of work and still come up with enough money to pay for my second semester of college, when my boss came up to me. He asked me if I had any interest in sticking around over the Christmas break to work. I would get paid double time, and the work would be pretty easy. I wanted to go home to see my family for Christmas and hang out with my friends, but I really needed the cash so I decided to stay. It really wasn’t too bad most of the time I was there. Most students and faculty were gone and things were pretty quiet. It was just kind of lonely and desolate.

Helping Blended Families Thrive

Helping Blended Families Thrive

Blended families make for great sit-coms, but the challenges that real blended families aren’t as funny or able to be resolved in a 30-minute episode.

This past Sunday (September 30) we wrapped up a series called, The Elephant in the Family Room, at our church. In the series, we covered some of the “un-talked-about” things that keep our families from being all that we would want them to be (you can check out the podcasts here).

LAST OF THE BUFFALO

LAST OF THE BUFFALO

“The definition of insanity is repeating the same things over and over again and expecting a different result.” 

Ever heard that cliché? It has been mis-attributed to Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, and Mark Twain (Actually, none of them is the source. It appears in print for the first time in a 1981 Narcotic Anonymous text.) Despite the origins of the quote, we all get the sentiment – you can’t keep making the same mistakes and then be shocked when nothing changes. Having said that, here’s myform of “insanity.” I keep thinking things will happen as fast as I believe they should and that they will turn out exactly the way I expected them to. And then I get shocked when it doesn’t happen. Every. Time.